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The Strict Teacher v. The Fun Teacher: 5 Ways I have Changed

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The Strict Teacher v. The Fun Teacher: 5 Ways I have Changed

Post by sassy86 on Sat Apr 21, 2012 4:13 pm

I Wanted to share this article with you since it is close to my own experience. So I started as a 'strict' teacher and ended up adopting a more flexible attitude like this this teacher Razz The class is far more agreeable both to me and my students. So how about you?? And what do you think concerning these changes ??


The Strict Teacher v. The Fun Teacher: 5 Ways I have Changed


I started out as the Strict Teacher:
Being a young, female, and brand new high school teacher has got to be one of the toughest jobs around. I’m not saying I don’t love it, but it was definitely no piece of cake. I wanted to be taken seriously. I wanted students to see me as their teacher, disciplinarian, and NOT their best friend. I had only the highest expectations of my students and I responded with tough love. I realize now that I didn’t smile as a beginning teacher as much as I do in “real life.” When some of my students hated me for giving them zero’s for late work, or copying their classmates’ work, I reminded myself that they would thank me later. I convinced myself that it didn’t matter if they like me or not…

I still stand firm in most of these principles, but I have changed a few things:

1. I smile a lot more. I think that first sentence says it all, don’t you think? =)


2. I ask my students about their lives. I am truly, genuinely interested in what is going on with my students this year. I obviously can’t just tell myself to suddenly become interested in getting to know them, so this must have been a subconscious flip of the switch within me. Whatever the reason, I am so glad it happened. While there are some things I prefer to not know about them, it just so happens that they are fascinating and delightful human beings! And we have lots in common too. After all, every Wednesday I discuss the latest Glee episode with half of my homeroom….

3. I remember that no student (or teacher) is perfect. I have not lowered my academic expectations for my students, but I have definitely lowered my behavioral expectations. Why was I expecting 15 and 16 year olds to act as mature as adults, anyway? And since when are all adults ridiculously mature (myself included)? Teenagers aren’t perfect, but they sure can be hilarious. I might as well enjoy the good times with them and allow the “fun” back in the classroom!

4. I give them second chances. For example, I used to have a strict “NO late work” policy that would often cost them quite afew points. I still believe that learning to meet deadlines is a crucial life skill that should be emphasized in the classroom. However, Irealized that I wasn’t giving my students a chance to learn from their mistakes. Thanks to tips from other veteran teachers, I developed a system where students get a few hall passes and one late work pass per semester. They can choose to use them if necessary, or they can turn them in at the end of the semester for extra credit points. It is very rare that I give extra credit and my students would literally do anything for it!


5. I let them get to know me. I used to hide a lot of info about myself from my students. There is still a lot they don’t know about me (and never will!) but I am so much more open with them this year. And I can tell that it makes a difference. They love hearing funny stories about my childhood, teenage years, or about relationships (especially since they love “Mr. Kaufhold”). When they feel that they know me, they are more willing to work hard in my classroom. And what a relief it is to be able to “be yourself” in your work place!

So have I become the “Fun Teacher?” Not necessarily. Am I against the idea of being the “fun teacher?” Not necessarily. Do I want to be the “fun teacher?” Again…not necessarily. But I am glad I have lightened up. I enjoy my days so much more when I enjoy my students and myself. On the other hand…maybe I am able to lighten up because I started out as the “strict teacher?”

What do you all think, which is better for a young, new teacher? Should we start out as strict? Or should we be the sweet, smiling, and silly people we would normally be in “real life?”


Source:

http://teachtraveltaste.com/2011/03/23/the-strict-teacher-v-the-fun-teacher-5-ways-i-have-changed/
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sassy86

Number of posts : 1227
Age : 30
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Re: The Strict Teacher v. The Fun Teacher: 5 Ways I have Changed

Post by princess smile24 on Fri Aug 10, 2012 3:36 pm

Hi sassy, the topic is very interesting. I want to tell you that I have started teaching at primary school Rolling Eyes with no idea how it will be, and I have tarted very, very, very strict and serious till one day when I smiled with my mate, my pupils were chocked Shocked ( they never imagined I can smile Sad ) and I heard them saying for each other:" did you see? maitresse has smiled..." and that was really moving for me and I recognized how much I was so sever with them. Now, moving to middle school this year incaallah, I really wonder what to do, I am going to apply what you have mention, I mean to be flexible and fun WITH LIMITS, because I see it more useful and I hope it will work with me. Cross fingers.
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princess smile24

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Re: The Strict Teacher v. The Fun Teacher: 5 Ways I have Changed

Post by sassy86 on Fri Aug 10, 2012 11:35 pm

Saha ftourak Princess Smile You see!! When you smiled, and because your students were not used to that, you looked like an alien for them cyclops Razz . It hurt you and I do understand that because they falsely thought you're not 'normal' like them.

I believe Princess that the younger they are, the more flexible you must be and also close to them! Learning their names is the first step to get close to them and break boundaries. Next one, is trying to show them that you're not that different even if you might not have the same age! But you listen to the same singers, know the same movies and share the same interests. You're not supposed to talk about movies and songs but to teach them I know, but why not inserting some vocabulary in your grammar exercises and say 'don't you know this word?! It reminds me of that song which says ...etc'

There are thousand ways and I'm sure you'll do great, just trust yourself and trust them ! Smile
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