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Writers & Poets

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Writers & Poets

Post by Thewolf on Tue Aug 03, 2010 3:40 pm


Hi mates, i'm going to tell you something about Edgar Allan Poe. will you tell us about your favourite Writer or Poet ?



Edgar Allan Poe
(1809-1849), American writer, known as a poet and critic but most famous as the first master of the short-story form (see Short Story), especially the psychological horror tale. Both his poems and his tales of the mysterious and macabre produce a haunting effect, often reflecting Poe’s obsession with death. Many of the stories express abnormal states of mind and are constructed in terms of a single mad obsession. Poe is also important for his literary theories and for his invention of the modern detective story. Many major American and European writers have professed their artistic debt to him. His influence can be seen in the work of such diverse writers as Charles Baudelaire, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
Poe's life


Born in Boston, Massachusetts, Poe was orphaned in his early childhood and taken to Richmond, Virginia, to be raised by John Allan, a successful merchant, and his wife. From the Allans, Poe acquired his middle name. At the age of six Poe went to England with the Allan family and was placed in a private school. After returning to the United States in 1820, he continued to study in private schools. He attended the University of Virginia for a year, but in 1827 Allan, displeased by Poe’s drinking and gambling, refused to pay his debts and forced him to work as a clerk.


Poe, disliking his new duties intensely, quit the job, thus alienating Allan, and went to Boston. There his first book, Tamerlane and Other Poems (1827), was published anonymously. Shortly afterward Poe enlisted in the United States Army and served a two-year term. In 1829 his second volume of verse, Al Aaraaf, was published, and he achieved a reconciliation with Allan, who secured him an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. After only a few months at the academy, Poe was expelled for neglect of duty, and Allan disowned him permanently.


Poe’s third book, Poems, appeared in 1831, and the following year he moved to Baltimore, where he lived with his aunt and her young daughter, Virginia Clemm. The following year he won a contest sponsored by the Baltimore Saturday Visitor with the short story “A MS. Found in a Bottle,” which relates how a sailing vessel is sucked down into an enormous whirlpool. In 1835 Poe became editor of the Southern Literary Messenger of Richmond, a magazine to which he contributed thoughtful but often scathing reviews, and tales of wonder and terror.


In 1836 Poe married his cousin Virginia, who was not yet 14 years old; her mother managed the household. His connection with the Messenger ended in 1837, when he was discharged for drunkenness. Throughout the next decade, much of which was marred by his wife’s long illness, Poe worked as an editor for various periodicals in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and New York City. In 1847 Virginia died of tuberculosis and Poe himself became ill. His disastrous dependence on alcohol and his alleged use of drugs, recorded by contemporaries, may have contributed to his early death. Poe died in Baltimore on October 7, 1849.


Any questions are welcome, hope we can answer.
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Re: Writers & Poets

Post by the bright queen on Tue Aug 03, 2010 7:02 pm

Thnanks alot.. really helpful information..keep on posting
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Re: Writers & Poets

Post by Biba on Thu Aug 05, 2010 1:35 am

Good job!

well, my favourite writer is : Jane Austen. I read her "Sense and sensibility". It's really nice!


About Jane Austen (
1775_1817)








Jane Austen was born in 1775 at Steventon in Hampshire, in the south of England. She was the sixth of seven children of a clergyman, the Reverend George Austen. He was a well-educated man, who encouraged Jane in both her reading and her writing. In 1801 the family moved to Bath; then,after George Austen's death ,to Southampton,and finally to Chwton in Hampshire.She led a quite ,uneventful life , occasionally visiting London,Bath,Lyme,and her brothers' houses. She never married though she had several admirers. However, her life was spent in a close and affectionate family circle. She died in Winchester in 1817.
She started writing when she was only fourteen, and by her early twenties was already working on the first versions of some of her novels. She didn't write on great events , like the French Revolution or the Napoleonic wars , both of which happened during her lifetime. She wrote about what she knew best-the daily business of social visits, romantic affaires, and matchmaking.
Her six major novels are now classics of English literature. They are : Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, Northanger Abbey and Presuation. Her novels were praised for their wit and style by readers at the time . There have been film and television dramatisations of all the novels.
Jane Austen is one of the greatest novelists in the English language . Her novels are comedies of manners , dealing with parties,dresses, equarrels, engagements, and marriages, but no writer has ever drawn "such pictures of domestic life in country villages" with a sharper eye or with a more exquisite irony.

Aristotle: I took the liberty to provide your post with a picture of Jane Austen.
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Re: Writers & Poets

Post by messi on Thu Aug 05, 2010 12:51 pm

Very interesting!
Just an advice: Try to summarize. don't bring the whole Wikipedia...it's just an idea!
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John Milton ( 1608-1674)

Post by Thewolf on Fri Aug 06, 2010 5:04 pm

John Milton
(1608-1674)

English poet, whose rich, dense verse was a powerful influence on succeeding English poets, and whose prose was devoted to the defense of civil and religious liberty. Milton is often considered the greatest English poet after Shakespeare. His masterpiece, Paradise Lost, is considered unsurpassed among English epic poems. It is a powerfully imaginative and dramatic work, based in part on the biblical story of the temptation and fall of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden.

( You may get help ) If you will ask about his life and works

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Re: Writers & Poets

Post by w_ch on Fri Aug 06, 2010 5:20 pm



Thomas Carlyle (4 December 1795 – 5 February 1881) was a Scottish satirical writer, essayist, historian and teacher during the Victorian era. He called economics "the dismal science" wrote articles for the Edinburgh Encyclopedia, and became a controversial social commentator.
Coming from a strict Calvinist family, Carlyle was expected by his parents to become a preacher, but while at the University of Edinburgh, he lost his Christian faith. Calvinist values, however, remained with him throughout his life. This combination of a religious temperament with loss of faith in traditional Christianity made Carlyle's work appealing to many Victorians who were grappling with scientific and political changes that threatened the traditional social order.
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Re: Writers & Poets

Post by imy on Fri Aug 06, 2010 7:44 pm



Walt Witman:

Born on Long Island,New York,Walt Whitman was a parttime carpenter and man of the people, whose brilliant, innovative work expressed the country's democratic spirit. He largely selftaught; he left school at the age of 11 to go to work. His Leaves of Grass (1855), which he rewrote and revised throughout his life , contains "Song of Myself", an original poem ever written by an American.
here are some lines:

I celebrate myself, and rising myself,
And what i assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.




N.B: actually there is a teacher who likes very much Walt Witman,
her over talk of him led me to search a bit.

Aristotle: I took the liberty to provide you post with a picture.
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Re: Writers & Poets

Post by w_ch on Fri Aug 06, 2010 8:03 pm



Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American philosopher, lecturer, essayist, and poet, best remembered for leading the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thought through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States.
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Re: Writers & Poets

Post by cookie on Sat Aug 07, 2010 10:43 pm




charles Dickens
was born on February 7, 1812, the son of John and Elizabeth Dickens. John Dickens was a clerk in the Naval Pay Office. He had a poor head for finances, and in 1824 found himself imprisoned for debt. His wife and children, with the exception of Charles, who was put to work at Warren's Blacking Factory, joined him in the Marshalsea Prison. When the family finances were put at least partly to rights and his father was released, the twelve-year-old Dickens, already scarred psychologically by the experience, was further wounded by his mother's insistence that he continue to work at the factory. His father, however, rescued him from that fate, and between 1824 and 1827 Dickens was a day pupil at a school in London. At fifteen, he found employment as an office boy at an attorney's, while he studied shorthand at night. His brief stint at the Blacking Factory haunted him all of his life — he spoke of it only to his wife and to his closest friend, John Forster — but the dark secret became a source both of creative energy and of the preoccupation with the themes of alienation and betrayal which would emerge, most notably, in David Copperfield and in Great Expectations.
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George Bernard Shaw

Post by Thewolf on Thu Sep 23, 2010 2:45 pm


George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Irish-born writer, considered the most significant British dramatist since William Shakespeare. His plays are essentially brilliant dialogues on such topics as religion, politics, money, science, marriage, and art. Although regarded as comedies, the plays represent a serious effort to influence the ideas and attitudes of the audience. Often, conventional ideas are inverted or twisted to shock the public into a fresh awareness. Despite his emphasis on ideas, Shaw created probably the most memorable collection of dramatic characters since the 17th century.
In addition to being a prolific playwright (he wrote 50 stage plays), Shaw is regarded as the most readable music critic and best theater critic of his generation. He was also one of literature’s great letter writers.
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Re: Writers & Poets

Post by Thewolf on Wed Dec 15, 2010 6:32 pm

Chinua Achebe


in full Albert Chinualumogu Achebe
born Nov. 16, 1930, Ogidi, Nigeria

-prominent Igbo (Ibo) novelist acclaimed for his unsentimental depictions of the social and psychological disorientation accompanying the imposition of Western customs and values upon traditional African society. His particular concern was with emergent Africa at its moments of crisis; his novels range in subject matter from the first contact of an African village with the white man to the educated African's attempt to create a firm moral order out of the changing values in a large city.

Educated in English at the University of Ibadan, Achebe taught for a short time before joining the staff of the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation in Lagos, where he served as director of external broadcasting during 1961–66. In 1967 he cofounded a publishing company at Enugu with the poet Christopher Okigbo, who died shortly thereafter in the Nigerian civil war. In 1969 Achebe toured the United States with his fellow writers Gabriel Okara and Cyprian Ekwensi, lecturing at universities. Upon his return to Nigeria he was appointed research fellow at the University of Nigeria and became professor of English, a position he held from 1976 until 1981 (professor emeritus from 1985). He was director (from 1970) of two Nigerian publishers, Heinemann Educational Books Ltd. and Nwankwo-Ifejika Ltd. After an automobile accident in Nigeria in 1990 that left him partially paralyzed, he moved to the United States, where he taught at Bard College in New York.

Things Fall Apart (1958), Achebe's first novel, concerns traditional Igbo life at the time of the advent of missionaries and colonial government in his homeland. His principal character cannot accept the new order, even though the old has already collapsed. In No Longer at Ease (1960) he portrayed a newly appointed civil servant, recently returned from university study in England, who is unable to sustain the moral values he believes to be correct in the face of the obligations and temptations of his new position.

In Arrow of God (1964), set in the 1920s in a village under British administration, the principal character, the chief priest of the village, whose son becomes a zealous Christian, turns his resentment at the position he is placed in by the white man against his own people. A Man of the People (1966) and Anthills of the Savannah (1987) deal with corruption and other aspects of postcolonial African life.

Achebe also published several collections of short stories and a children's book, How the Leopard Got His Claws (1973; with John Iroaganachi). Beware, Soul-Brother (1971) and Christmas in Biafra (1973) are collections of poetry. Another Africa (1998) combines an essay and poems by Achebe with photographs by Robert Lyons. Achebe's books of essays include Morning Yet on Creation Day (1975), Hopes and Impediments (1988), and Home and Exile (2000). In 2007 he won the Man Booker International Prize.
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Re: Writers & Poets

Post by Guest on Wed Dec 15, 2010 7:14 pm

I'm reading Chinua's Things Fall Apart!!

Theodore Dreiser (1871-1945
Considered by many as the leader of Naturalism in American writing. In his fiction, Dreiser deals with social problems and with characters who struggle to survive. His sympathetic treatment of a "morally loose" woman in Sister Carrie was called immoral and he suffered at the hands of publishers. One of Dreiser's favorite fictional devices was the use of contrast between the rich and the poor, the urbane and the unsophisticated, and the power brokers and the helpless. While he wrote about "raw" experiences of life in his earlier works, in his later writing he considered the impact of economic society on the lives of people in the remarkable trilogy - The Financier, The Titan, and The Stoic. His best known work is An American Tragedy which shows a young man trying to succeed in a materialistic society.

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Re: Writers & Poets

Post by mimi cici on Sat Dec 25, 2010 5:18 pm

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English poet, dramatist, and actor, considered by many to be the greatest dramatist of all time. Some of Shakespeare's plays, such as Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet, are among the most famous literary works of the world. However, his early works did not match the artistic quality of Marlowe's dramas. Ben Jonson (1572-1637), another contemporary playwright, wrote that Shakespeare's "wit was in his own power; would the rule of it had been so too". Shakespeare possessed a large vocabulary for his day, having used 29,066 different words in his plays. Today the average English-speaking person uses something like 2,000 words in everyday speech. "It may be that the essential thing with Shakespeare is his ease and authority and thay you just have to accept him as he is if you are going to be able to admire him properly, in the way you accept nature, a piece of scenery for example, just as it is." (Ludwig Wittgenstein in Culture and Value, 1980) There is not much records of Shakespeare´s personal life. Rumors arise from time to time that he did not write his plays, but the real author was Christopher Marlowe, Queen Elizabeth or Edward De Vere (1550-1604), whom T.J. Looney identified in 1920 as the author of Shakespeare's plays. A large body of 'Oxfordians' have since built on this claim and the reluctance to believe that a man of humble origins could be such a great author. According to some numerologists, Shakespeare wrote The King James Version of the Bible at the age of 46. Their "evidence": Shake is the 46th word of the 46th Psalm, Spear is the 46th word from the end in the 46th Psalm. William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon-Avon, a small country town. Stratford was famous for its malting. The black plague killed in 1564 one out of seven of the town's 1,500 inhabitants. Shakespeare was the eldest son of Mary Arden, the daughter of a local landowner, and her husband, John Shakespeare (c. 1530-1601), a glover and wood dealer. John Aubrey (1626-1697) tells in Brief Lives that Shakespeare's father was a butcher and the young William exercised his father's trade, "but when he kill'd a Calfe he would do it in a high style, and make a speech." In 1568 John Shakespeare was made a mayor of Stratford and a justice of peace. His wool business failed in the 1570s, and in 1580 he was fined ¤40, with other 140 men, for failing to find surety to keep the peace. There is not record that his fine was paid. Later the church commissioners reported of him and eight other men that they had failed to attend church "for fear of process for debt". The family's position was restored in the 1590s by earnings of William Shakespeare, and in 1596 he was awarded a coat of arms. Very little is known about Shakespeare early life, and his later works have inspired a number of interpretations. T.S. Eliot wrote that "I would suggest that none of the plays of Shakespeare has a "meaning," although it would be equally false to say that a play of Shakespeare is meaningless." (from Selected Essays, new edition, 1960). Shakespeare is assumed to have been educated at Stratford Grammar School, and he may have spent the years 1580-82 as a teacher for the Roman Catholic Houghton family in Lancashire. When Shakespeare was 15, a woman from a nearby village drowned in the Avon. Her death was ruled accidental but it may have been a suicide. Later in Hamlet Shakespeare left open the question whether Ophelia died accidentally or by her own hand. At the age of 18, Shakespeare married a local girl, Anne Hathaway (died 1623), who was eight years older. Their first child, Susannah, was born within six months, and twins Hamnet and Judith were born in 1585. Hamnet, Shakespeare's only son, died in 1596, at the age of 11. It has often been suggested, that the lines in King John, beginning with "Grief fills the room of my absent child", reflects Shakespeare's grief. Hamlet was first printed in 1603. It is Shakespeare's largest drama, based on a lost play r-Hamlet. Prince Hamlet, an enigmatic intellectual, mourns both his father's death and his mother's remarriage. His father's ghost appears to him and tells that Claudius, married to Queen Gertrude, Hamlet's mother, poisoned him. Hamlet, fascinated by cruelly witty games, swears revenge. "The time is out of joint; O cursed spite, That ever I was born to set it right!" He arranges an old play whose story has a parallel to that of Claudius. Hamlet's behavior is considered mad. He kills the eavesdropping Polonius, the court chamberlain, by thrusting his sword through a curtain. Polonius's son Laertes returns to Denmark to avenge his father's death. Polonius's daughter Ofelia loves Hamlet, but the prince's sadistically brutal behavior drives her to madness. "Get thee to a nunnery: why wouldst thou be a breeder of sinners?" he tells Ophelia who dies by drowning. Before the slaughter that ends the story, Hamlet says to his friend Horatio: "I shall win at the odds. But thou wouldst not think how ill all's here about my heart." A duel takes place and ends with the death of Gertrude, Laertes, Claudius, and Hamlet, whose final words are "the rest is silence.
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