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The correct use of prepositions

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The correct use of prepositions

Post by messi on Sat Jul 24, 2010 2:49 pm

This is my first request in this forum I hope I'll find your aid
I have a problem using preposition for example:
he is taking to him or
he is talking with him ?

please in a simple language if possible!
if you have some docs or something,,it will be nice!
Thanks
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Re: The correct use of prepositions

Post by louli on Sat Jul 24, 2010 5:13 pm

check this site, it includz an interstin course!

here


this PDF will be helpful as well..

here PDF
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Re: The correct use of prepositions

Post by JOKER on Sat Jul 24, 2010 6:24 pm

here is some useful things, but i think ur problem is phrasal verbs




One point in time


On is used with
days:



  • I will
    see you on Monday.

  • The
    week begins on Sunday.




At is used
with noon, night, midnight, and with the time of day:



  • My
    plane leaves at noon.

  • The movie
    starts at 6 p.m.




In is used
with other parts of the day, with months, with years, with seasons:



  • He
    likes to read in the afternoon.

  • The
    days are long in August.

  • The
    book was published in 1999.

  • The
    flowers will bloom in spring.




Extended time


To express
extended time, English uses the following prepositions: since, for, by,
from—to, from-until, during,(with)in



  • She has
    been gone since yesterday. (She left yesterday and has not returned.)

  • I'm
    going to Paris for two weeks. (I will spend two weeks there.)

  • The
    movie showed from August to October. (Beginning in August and ending in
    October.)

  • The
    decorations were up from spring until fall. (Beginning in spring and
    ending in fall.)

  • I watch
    TV during the evening. (For some period of time in the evening.)

  • We must
    finish the project within a year. (No longer than a year.)




Place


To express
notions of place, English uses the following prepositions: to talk about the
point itself: in, to express something contained: inside, to talk
about the surface: on, to talk about a general vicinity, at.



  • There
    is a wasp in the room.

  • Put the
    present inside the box.

  • I left
    your keys on the table.

  • She was
    waiting at the corner.




Higher than a point


To express
notions of an object being higher than a point, English uses the following prepositions:
over, above.



  • He
    threw the ball over the roof.

  • Hang
    that picture above the couch.




Lower than a point


To express
notions of an object being lower than a point, English uses the following
prepositions: under, underneath, beneath, below.



  • The rabbit
    burrowed under the ground.

  • The
    child hid underneath the blanket.

  • We
    relaxed in the shade beneath the branches.

  • The
    valley is below sea-level.




Close to a point


To express
notions of an object being close to a point, English uses the following
prepositions: near, by, next to, between, among, opposite.



  • She
    lives near the school.

  • There
    is an ice cream shop by the store.

  • An oak
    tree grows next to my house

  • The
    house is between Elm Street and Maple Street.

  • I found
    my pen lying among the books.

  • The
    bathroom is opposite that room.




To introduce objects of verbs


English uses
the following prepositions to introduce objects of the following verbs.



At: glance, laugh, look, rejoice, smile, stare


  • She
    took a quick glance at her reflection.
    (exception with mirror: She took a quick glance in the
    mirror.)

  • You
    didn't laugh at his joke.

  • I'm
    looking at the computer monitor.

  • We
    rejoiced at his safe rescue.

  • That
    pretty girl smiled at you.

  • Stop
    staring at me.




Of: approve, consist, smell


  • I don't
    approve of his speech.

  • My
    contribution to the article consists of many pages.

  • He came
    home smelling of alcohol.




Of (or about): dream, think


  • I dream
    of finishing college in four years.

  • Can you
    think of a number between one and ten?

  • I am
    thinking about this problem.




For: call, hope, look, wait, watch, wish


  • Did
    someone call for a taxi?

  • He
    hopes for a raise in salary next year.

  • I'm
    looking for my keys.

  • We'll
    wait for her here.

  • You go
    buy the tickets and I'll watch for the train.

  • If you
    wish for an "A" in this class, you must work hard.







IN

We use in with months - in May
seasons - in winter
country - in Greece
city or town names - in New York
times of the day - in the morning, afternoon or evening
BUT at night!


ON

We use "on" with specific days - on
Friday, on New Year's Day, on April the 19th
American English - "on the weekend OR on weekends"
Also to designate names of streets, avenues, etc. - Her house is in Bortez
Road


AT

We use "at" with specific times - at 7
o'clock, at 6.15
at night
specific places in a city - at school
British English - "at the weekend OR at weekends"
Also for specif addresses. - He lives at 55 Bortez Road in Durham


TO

We use "to" with verbs which show movement
such as go and come - He goes to school.
She returned to the store.
They are coming to the party tonight.
Also for names of land-areas: counties, states, etc. - Durham is in Windham
county.

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Re: The correct use of prepositions

Post by chinda on Sat Jul 24, 2010 7:55 pm

I think both of " with" and "to" can be used with the verb "talk"; you can say: He is talking to him or he is talking with him.


-The use of preposition collocations.

A

To accuse sb of sth NOT for sth
To be (un)accustomed to sth NOT with sth
To be addicted to sth NOT with/on/in sth
To adjust to sth NOT with/in sth
To affect sb/sth NOT on sb/sth
To (dis)approve of sb/sth NOT for sb/sth
To have a(n) (dis)advantage over sb/sth NOT to/from sth
To (dis)agree on sth NOT for sth
To apply to sb/sth for sth NOT in sb/sth for sth
To argue about sth (=to disagree about sth) NOT for sth
To srgue for sth (=to offer reasons why sth should not be/happen etc) NOT about sth
To arrive at a conclusion/fixed address NOT in a conclusion/fixed address

B

To be (un)aware of sth NOT about sth
To place a ban on sth NOT for/about sth
To benefit from sth NOT with/on sth
To blame sb/sth for sth NOT about/of sth

C

To be (in)capable of sth NOT for sth
To comment on sth NOT about/for sth
To comply with sth NOT by sth
To concentrate on sth NOT about/over sth
To be (un)concerned with/about sth NOT for sth
To connect sth to sth else NOT in/on sth else
A connection between two things NOT among/by/with two things
To contribute to sth NOT in sth

D

A decline/decrease in sth (e.g. popularity) NOT of sth
To decrease sth by a certain amount NOT with a certain amount
To depend on sb/sth NOT in/by sb/sth
To differ/be different from sb/sth NOT than /to sb/sth
To disconnect sth from sth else NOT of/with/to sth else
To distinguish between two things/people NOT among/from two things/people

E

To be (in)eligible for sth NOT in/to sth
To emerge from sth NOT by sth
To put emphasis on sth NOT to sth
To be (in) essential to/for sth NOT about sth
To excuse sb for sth (=to forgive sb for sth) NOT from sth
To excuse sb from sth (=to give permission not to do sth) NOT for sth
To experiment on sth (animals, etc) NOT in/with sth
To experiment with sth (methods, substances, etc) NOT in/on sth
To be (un)equal to sth NOT as/with sth
To be exempt from sth (-not to have to do sth) NOT for sth

F

To be faced with sth NOT by sth
To be (un)familiar to sb (=to be known by sb) NOT with sb
To be (un)familiar with sb (=to know sb) NOT to sb

G

To graduate from sth (a university/college) NOT in/by sth
To graduate in sth (a subject) NOT from sth

H

To be harmful/harmless to sb/sth NOT for sb/sth
To be a hazard to sb/sth NOT for sb/sth

I

An increase in sth NOT of sth
To increase sth by a certain amount NOT with a certain amount
To be ignorant of sth NOT about/for sth
To be inferior to sb/sth NOT from/than sb/sth
To have the intention of doing sth NOT for doing sth
To be (un)interested in sb/sth NOT about/for sth
To invest sth in sth NOT sth on sth

J

To offer justification for sth NOT about sth

K

To know of/about sth NOT for sth

L

To have a lack of sth NOT for sth
To lecture on a topic (=give a lecture) NOT about a topic
To lecture sb about sth (=warn, reprimand) NOT on sth
To be liable for sth (responsible for sth) NOT about/to sth
To be liable to sth (=likely to suffer from sth) NOT for/about sth

M

To be married to sb NOT with sb

N

To be (un)necessary for/to sth NOT in sth
To take notice of sth NOT for/about sth
To notify sb of sth NOT for sth

O

To object to sb/sth NOT against sb/sth
To be opposed to sth NOT against sth
To be opposite sth NOT from/over sth

P

To be (un) popular with sb (=(dis)liked by sb) NOT for sb
To prefer sb/sth to sb/sth else NOT from sb/sth else

Q

To quit sth NOT from sth

R

To have/give a reason for sth NOT about sth
To refer to sth NOT at/in sth
To be (un)related to sb/sth NOT with sb/sth
To be (ir)relevant to sb/sth NOT with sb/sth
To rely on sb/sth NOT in/by sb/sth
To have respect for sb/sth NOT of sb/sth
To result from sth (=to arise from sth) NOT of sth
To result in sth (=to cause sth) NOT to sth

S

To be (dis)(un)satisfied with sth NOT by/for sth
To be (in)sensitive to sth NOT with/for/by sth
To be (dis)similar to sth NOT as sth
To submit sth to sb NOT for sb
To be superior to sb/sth NOT from/than sb/sth
To suffer from/with sth NOT by sth
To be (un)suitable for sth NOT to/in sth

T

To threaten sb with sth NOT sb to do sth
To undergo/prescribe treatment for sth NOT of/about sth

V

To be valued (=appreciated, well though of) NOT to be valued at
To be valued at (a price) NOT to be valued

W

To wish for sth NOT to wish sth
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Re: The correct use of prepositions

Post by Thewolf on Sat Jul 24, 2010 8:28 pm

This file might help too...
Click: http://www.4shared.com/file/0JyGfmD8/Ins_and_Outs_of_Prepositions.html
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Re: The correct use of prepositions

Post by louli on Sat Jul 24, 2010 8:40 pm

Nice course (Joker, Chinda)..but chinda i think that therz absolutly a difference between "im talkin to U" & "im talkin with U" tho both can b used:

"talkin to U" sounds more serious & quite stressed than "talkin with U"
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Re: The correct use of prepositions

Post by JOKER on Sat Jul 24, 2010 10:04 pm

I found that : 'Talk to' has the sense of direct communication person to person whereas 'talk with' indicates more a conversation. If you ask: Who is that person talking to Fred?
you are more interested in the identity of the person. If you ask: Who
is that person talking with Fred? you also want to know the identity but
at the same time you are commenting on the fact that Fred is actually
having a conversation with anyone at all.
Thank you chinda
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Re: The correct use of prepositions

Post by Guest on Sat Jul 24, 2010 11:40 pm

This is a nice bok, it will help you:
http://www.mediafire.com/?yrr93uvrfoor8c5

And this a wnderful one, you can thank Ismailos:
http://www.mediafire.com/?nw5nuqjtjmz

And follow this nice course, also enjoy the native's accent:
http://www.mediafire.com/?jepnlh2xqkbkubp

I hope we helped you Mess.


Guest
Guest


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Re: The correct use of prepositions

Post by Abd El Hamid on Sun Jul 25, 2010 1:51 pm

Valuable books and websites, but my advice for you is to get in touch with native speakers; you'll find yourself learning them autoumatically. But this does not mean your ignorance of the lessons.
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Re: The correct use of prepositions

Post by messi on Sun Jul 25, 2010 10:04 pm

WAw!....now I don't know where to start reading?!(too much help hehe)

Thank you mates really appreciate your help
I'll start readin If I needed something I'll back Ok?!

and for your advice Mr. A.Hamid I find if very interesting I'll give it a try Thank you!
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Re: The correct use of prepositions

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